Video

Apr 22, 2014
@ 2:45 pm
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4 notes

If anyone wanted to know what it was like to go to a punk industrial club in Latvia in 1994, here you go. I went to this club once (or if it wasn’t this one, it was one that was nearly identical, down in an ancient cellar in Old Riga, teens and post-teens in flannel and jeans, someone shoving someone else just for the hell of it) not long after this was filmed. I remember I brought some fellow exchange students with me and they were all terrified. The band on stage was playing a thrash metal version of Reel 2 Real’s “I Like To Move It.”

My Latvian friends were there too, one of them had brought his doberman. They all had sleeves pulled over their hands and hair in their eyes and everything was dark and loud and joyfully angry. It’s still one of my favorite memories of a place that I was never quite able to pin down. 

(Get past the first minute, which is just chaos and noise.)

(God, when the cameraman turns on the lights at 1:36, like a horror film, but that was exactly it. You had no idea what you were heading into but you knew it was going to be cool as shit.)


Photo

Apr 17, 2014
@ 5:19 pm
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1 note

My Recent eBay Purchase History: An Autobiography

My Recent eBay Purchase History: An Autobiography


Photo

Apr 14, 2014
@ 12:37 pm
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The “J” is a saxophone!

The “J” is a saxophone!


Photo

Apr 8, 2014
@ 9:43 pm
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3,552 notes

(Source: pacificfeelings, via futurecalm)


Text

Apr 8, 2014
@ 10:50 am
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55 notes

Celebrities who look like mattresses

jkottke:

Oh, this is the dumbest thing but it made me laugh today: Celebrities that Look Like Mattresses.

Mattress celeb

Mattress celeb

How on Earth did they find these pairings? Has Google perfected their Mattress Recognition technology? (via @Rebeccamead_NYC)


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Apr 8, 2014
@ 10:41 am
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untitled on Flickr.

untitled on Flickr.


Video

Apr 8, 2014
@ 9:54 am
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3 notes

Zero surprise that I prefer the Todd Rundgren version. 


Link

Apr 7, 2014
@ 2:28 pm
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To the People of Cincinnati - Belt Magazine | Dispatches From The Rust Belt »

Read the full introduction at Belt Magazine.

I’m incredibly proud of this book, if for no other reason than it has taught me how to be bold in asking people for help, that there’s no loss in the asking. At the same time I’ve come to realize that people generally love helping with fun ideas; almost everyone said yes, and those who said no did so reluctantly because they felt they didn’t have anything to offer. In fact, most said yes, and then suggested another great person to contact who would make the book even better.

The making of this book was a true collective experience, and that experience has allowed me to see this city in a different light, discover corners of opportunity I hadn’t yet come across while living here, and even get called “good people” by my favorite relief pitcher. I made this book as a gift to my new city, and although I’m a notoriously terrible gift-giver, I think I really got this one right.


Video

Apr 1, 2014
@ 11:01 am
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3 notes

Spot the Difference

Yesterday I took three separate pictures of three separate Johnny Cueto pitches through my binoculars. All three photos happened to be taken at the same moment in his follow-through, and all three pictures look nearly identical. I wish I’d written down the statistics for these three pitches: miles per hour, ball or strike, where they landed in the batter’s zone. 

It’s not just Cueto: Frazier too crouches at third, waiting in a position he knows will let him spring up in anticipation of the catch or the play, does he cover third, does he reach for the line drive. Even the umpire: hand on thigh, head toward home plate.

One thing I find so interesting about baseball, the reason I go again and again, is the apparent consistency, the sameness that drives the sport, when nothing is exactly the same. In this moment, we have no idea if Frazier will head right or left. No matter how identical Cueto’s pitches appear, there are shifts in the wind that affect the ball’s path, a fraction of a second’s change in when his fingers release the ball that could result in a ball versus a strike. But this follow-through: the choreography that is performed over and over so many times that he knows it like the way you move one foot in front of another, like the way writers write with our fingers on the keyboard like pianists, knowing the strokes, but not always finding the same words. 

The fans, too: there’s an apparent sameness until you look closer; the differences are more subtle and therefore more rewarding once you see them. Yesterday in a sea of red behind Moerlein, all of us sea creatures wore different combinations of fan gear, different interpretations and sometimes different shades of red. The girl in the black blazer and red spandex. The guy with the t-shirt that made him look like a bobblehead. Two girls chattering in Cincinnati satin starter jackets. The dude with the sleeveless red denim vest, patches, red high tops, and a kerchief out his back pocket. This guy. Some more subtle than others, but no two exactly the same. Later that night, we watched Cosmos, and Neil deGrasse Tyson explained how, apart from twins, no two creatures on earth share the same DNA. So it is with people, and pitches, and writers.

Our subtle interpretations of life and love, the shifts in the wind and the words that make it worth going again and again and trying to spot the differences each time.


Photo

Apr 1, 2014
@ 10:27 am
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245 notes

mentalflossr:

The Most Popular Baseball Team by County


Either I need my eyes tested for color, or someone needs to help me figure out why the Baltimore Orioles are big in Idaho.
(Poor Mets get no love.)

mentalflossr:

The Most Popular Baseball Team by County

Either I need my eyes tested for color, or someone needs to help me figure out why the Baltimore Orioles are big in Idaho.

(Poor Mets get no love.)

(via bluishorange)