Video

Sep 20, 2014
@ 6:56 pm
Permalink
329,710 notes

tanya77:

designculturemind:

The future is here and it’s horrible

The future is here and it’s horrible. (*crying laughter*)

This is why I can’t trust driverless cars.

(Source: pierregrassou)


Video

Sep 20, 2014
@ 6:54 pm
Permalink
91,188 notes

Alexis Persani puts clothes on the sculptures of the museum   

(Source: asylum-art, via sufjand)


Quote

Sep 18, 2014
@ 8:09 pm
Permalink
177 notes

Separating your baseline personal desires from other factors, like the relationship you’re in at the moment or where your career stands, is a phenomenally difficult task. Not to mention the societal pressure. Despite the ever-increasing feminist influence on the mainstream, conventional wisdom still says that motherhood is womanity’s highest calling — just ask every CEO who refers to her kids as her greatest achievement. At the same time, young women get a loud and clear message that parenthood is tough. Really tough. Books like Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time top the best-seller list. Blunt headlines explain that women pay a major penalty at work for becoming mothers. Even the parenting-related clickbait is scary: “100 Reasons Not to Have Kids.” Throw in a few wine-drunk conversations with friends who are parents about their sleepless, sexless lives, and who wouldn’t be at least a little bit ambivalent?

What If You Just Don’t Know If You Want Kids? - NYmag.com (via annfriedman)

I cannot amen this heartily enough. Fertility issues really make you think long and hard about why you want to have children, and the hardest part of it is when you realize that you’re completely unsure if you do or not. Too many people have children just because it’s the expected next step; not enough people really consider what the act of having children does or doesn’t do for their lives. I wish infertility issues on no one, but I wish this contemplation for everyone.


Text

Aug 27, 2014
@ 5:00 pm
Permalink
3 notes

An Incomplete List Of Dumb Things I’ve Said To My Cats

1. “Are you sweatin’? Sweatin’ to the oldies?”
2. “No, silly, we let crickets LIVE for good KARMA.”


Video

Aug 26, 2014
@ 11:23 pm
Permalink
5,526 notes

This is what our cat sees when she dreams I’m sure of it.

(Source: lolgifs.net, via freerangenalini)


Video

Aug 25, 2014
@ 3:42 pm
Permalink
7 notes

Beyoncé: “Close” Captions


Photo

Aug 12, 2014
@ 12:32 am
Permalink
1 note

Watching the pilot episode of Mork & Mindy. So many of my friends all over the place are talking about their own issues with depression and I just want to say that I am here and you have my number. If you don’t have my number, write to me at thatcupoftea@gmail.com and I’ll give it to you if you think you might need it some day. Reach out if you are able, and I’ll check in on you as often as I can.

Watching the pilot episode of Mork & Mindy. So many of my friends all over the place are talking about their own issues with depression and I just want to say that I am here and you have my number. If you don’t have my number, write to me at thatcupoftea@gmail.com and I’ll give it to you if you think you might need it some day. Reach out if you are able, and I’ll check in on you as often as I can.


Photo

Aug 4, 2014
@ 11:25 pm
Permalink
6 notes

Record Haul No. ???

Yes - 90125
Rusty Warren - Knockers Up!
Crowded House - s/t
Elvis Presley - Mahalo from Elvis
Gordon Lightfoot - Lightfoot!
Duran Duran - Rio
The Rolling Stones - Goats Head Soup
Judy Garland - At Carnegie Hall In Person
The Monkees - Head
Concert for Bangladesh

Every Monday night I volunteer at a used book warehouse that supports the public library. We spend a few hours sorting through blue plastic bins of books, either library discards or donations from the public.  Most of it is half chewed mildewed Bibles and ex-library James Patterson that we put into dumpsters for recycling. Sometimes there are interesting covers I photograph and put on Instagram.

They also sell records for a dollar a disc. Every once in a while I will come home with a Hall & Oates album or The Warriors soundtrack and we will spin a few tunes to wind down from volunteering while we cook (or, usually, J cooks) dinner. Tonight, I browsed the records after I’d combed through boxes of mass market paperbacks about Catholicism and ESP, and picked up Duran Duran, Yes, Crowded House, Elvis Presley. I saw the above album, by David Batteau, who I’d never heard of, and thought the sketch on the cover looked like a character in the Eve Babitz novel I’m taking way too long to read because I’m enjoying each sentence so much I’m reading them twice. The title was even “Happy in Hollywood” which seemed very Babitzian and pleased me. I tucked it in with the rest of my stash on a whim.

As I brought my stack to the register, Bindy, the head volunteer, told me that two of the other volunteers, Kathy and Shannon, had brought in hundreds of records they’d cleared out during their recent move. She let me go into the back room and sort through their stash after we closed for the night. Mostly Connie Francis records and Bill Cosby, some heavily scratched Cher. I found a Monkees album that looked like it had been chewed by a cat, but took it anyway. I also took The Rolling Stones, Concert for Bangladesh, and Judy Garland’s Carnegie Hall performance.

I added up my discs, and decided to put back the David Batteau with his mustache that looked like a book character to make it an even $10.

I left the warehouse clutching my haul, crossed the street to get jerk chicken wings from the Senegalese place in the tiny strip mall, and thought about the guy in the mustache. How often we see something that strikes our fancy, but can’t say why, but then later it turns out that there was a reason it was attractive to us in the first place. I got home and set aside the predictable records, the ones I knew already, and looked up David Batteau. He had a song called Spaceship Earth on YouTube, and within the first few notes I was cursing putting the record back in the stacks.

Sometimes we should give in, trust the things we’re attracted to, not spend too much time thinking about whether the attraction is worth spending time on. Life is worth spending time on. I know I’ll go back for that record. Love is worth spending time on.

I haven’t done one of these Record Haul posts in a while, but sitting here listening to Neil Finn singing about the world where you live (with a hint of tree frog seeping in from the woods outside) I’m thinking it’s good to write about the little things you enjoy once in a while. That’s what I miss most when I’m away from Tumblr for a while: this is where we fan out. Where we say, here, I like this, I don’t know why, but I do. And somehow it’s a valid part of who we are.

Record Haul No. ???

Yes - 90125
Rusty Warren - Knockers Up!
Crowded House - s/t
Elvis Presley - Mahalo from Elvis
Gordon Lightfoot - Lightfoot!
Duran Duran - Rio
The Rolling Stones - Goats Head Soup
Judy Garland - At Carnegie Hall In Person
The Monkees - Head
Concert for Bangladesh

Every Monday night I volunteer at a used book warehouse that supports the public library. We spend a few hours sorting through blue plastic bins of books, either library discards or donations from the public. Most of it is half chewed mildewed Bibles and ex-library James Patterson that we put into dumpsters for recycling. Sometimes there are interesting covers I photograph and put on Instagram.

They also sell records for a dollar a disc. Every once in a while I will come home with a Hall & Oates album or The Warriors soundtrack and we will spin a few tunes to wind down from volunteering while we cook (or, usually, J cooks) dinner. Tonight, I browsed the records after I’d combed through boxes of mass market paperbacks about Catholicism and ESP, and picked up Duran Duran, Yes, Crowded House, Elvis Presley. I saw the above album, by David Batteau, who I’d never heard of, and thought the sketch on the cover looked like a character in the Eve Babitz novel I’m taking way too long to read because I’m enjoying each sentence so much I’m reading them twice. The title was even “Happy in Hollywood” which seemed very Babitzian and pleased me. I tucked it in with the rest of my stash on a whim.

As I brought my stack to the register, Bindy, the head volunteer, told me that two of the other volunteers, Kathy and Shannon, had brought in hundreds of records they’d cleared out during their recent move. She let me go into the back room and sort through their stash after we closed for the night. Mostly Connie Francis records and Bill Cosby, some heavily scratched Cher. I found a Monkees album that looked like it had been chewed by a cat, but took it anyway. I also took The Rolling Stones, Concert for Bangladesh, and Judy Garland’s Carnegie Hall performance.

I added up my discs, and decided to put back the David Batteau with his mustache that looked like a book character to make it an even $10.

I left the warehouse clutching my haul, crossed the street to get jerk chicken wings from the Senegalese place in the tiny strip mall, and thought about the guy in the mustache. How often we see something that strikes our fancy, but can’t say why, but then later it turns out that there was a reason it was attractive to us in the first place. I got home and set aside the predictable records, the ones I knew already, and looked up David Batteau. He had a song called Spaceship Earth on YouTube, and within the first few notes I was cursing putting the record back in the stacks.

Sometimes we should give in, trust the things we’re attracted to, not spend too much time thinking about whether the attraction is worth spending time on. Life is worth spending time on. I know I’ll go back for that record. Love is worth spending time on.

I haven’t done one of these Record Haul posts in a while, but sitting here listening to Neil Finn singing about the world where you live (with a hint of tree frog seeping in from the woods outside) I’m thinking it’s good to write about the little things you enjoy once in a while. That’s what I miss most when I’m away from Tumblr for a while: this is where we fan out. Where we say, here, I like this, I don’t know why, but I do. And somehow it’s a valid part of who we are.


Photo

Aug 3, 2014
@ 8:09 pm
Permalink
50 notes

bremser:

Jaclyn Wright

bremser:

Jaclyn Wright

(Source: jaclynrwright)


Photo

Aug 3, 2014
@ 8:09 pm
Permalink
1,334 notes

(Source: palmandlaser, via sufjand)